Pakistan without Khan


Recently a friend shared with me a link, in which Time is going to publish its 2012 list of world’s most influential people. It prompted me to write something at minimum a piece that will help me or someone else to gather their thoughts.

It is the first time that I am aware that a political leader of Pakistan (Imran Khan) has been nominated to be in the world’s most influential people’s list. It gave me a tremendous amount of joy to see such things happening at last, even though there may be some who may not share the same joy. So to fully appreciate the influential nature of Imran Khan, let’s imagine what Pakistan would have been like if he did not exist.

The first iconic thought that comes to mind if, Imran Khan did not exist, is the glorious moment when we took the well-deserved, thick crystal Benson and Hedges cup. The glorious moment was in the 1992 Cricket World Cup, a memory that my country deems as being precious. Now imagine a country, full of passionate cricket lovers and players with drive and determination, and yet not winning a single world cup. It would be like eating the same meal everyday without any spice, flavor or satisfaction.

Radiation facility at SKMH

It is estimated that 1 in 3 people will have cancer in their lifetime, so if we consider the 7 billion world population, approximately 2.31 billion people, a very large number of people, will have cancer. We are a country with a population of 187 million, forming 2.7% of the world’s population. Out of 187 million people, 62 million may well be cancer patients in Pakistan. So now imagine a country which constitutes 2.68% cancer patients of the world without a single dedicated cancer hosp ital. A single cancer treatment costs 0.8-1 million PKR ($11K,£7.5K) and the estimated treatment cost of  only 100 people will be around 100 million PKR ($1.11M, £750K). So to be deprived of a hospital where 75% of cancer patients receive financial assistance and some which receive the treatments free would indeed be detrimental to the health of our people.

It is the dream of every student to go abroad for higher education, but not many can afford this luxury, especially in the region of Mianwalli, a backward region that also has the highest level of unemployment in Pakistan. The city has a population of approximately 1 million, out of which 45 % are youngsters and students. Many of these students are unable to afford the big universities within Pakistan let alone afford to study at foreign universities. These students are now able to earn an internationally acclaimed university degree by studying right there in their own city. Imagine them being deprived of this higher quality education. Imagine tatterdemalion of a dream of building up a city like Oxford right in the heart of Mianwalli.

Now coming to the current political situation, the happening, and the tide of awareness. The era of change, the era of hope, and the time where we all feel that we can get rid of these hounds sooner or later. The sudden awakening of these political gladiators and realizing the importance of the youth. The change in the political slogans, distribution of laptops, symbolizing the youth on the pamphlets, banners, etc. The realization of the importance of political arguments, debates, explaining one’s political stance and this sudden sanity of being truthful and honest. Imagine this all to vanish, imagine no political activity, and imagine 63% of the population, the youth, to have no importance. Imagine no sanity checks and no resignations based on morals and high esteem. Imagine no will to change, imagine the juridical and political death of the country, imagine the world’s most politicized youth not concerned with the mainstream politics anymore.

Imagine the dying out of HOPE, dying of the desire to change. Though its hard but in the end imagine Pakistan without Khan.

Moral:- Before we are ripped off a blessing, we should start apprising it.

by

Ali Waqar

@malikaliwaqar

*This was published at http://aliwaqar.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/pakistan-without-khan.html

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